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When someone becomes a registrar, are they sold software, or do they go to a website to operate?

GoDaddy, for example.

When they paid the ICANN the necessary fees to become a registrar, did ICANN sell them software/hardware to use?

 

Or does GoDaddy perform all of their transactions for customers on an ICANN website?

 

My question is also: what if GoDaddy tried to sell to me, as a favor, a domain that someone already owned:

could GoDaddy "force" the sale to me anyway?

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Super User I Super User I
Super User I
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Re: When someone becomes a registrar, are they sold software, or do they go to a website to operate?

The answer is "Yes" @nelsonkane.

 

There are different ways to be a registrar and different levels you can go for in addition to several companies you could use. What you get kind of depends on what you choose. You can expect everything from a turnkey website, documentation, tutorials, to API or nothing at all. 

 

As a registrar you sale new or available domains and/or broker existing domains. I don't think that GoDaddy is ever both the seller and broker? GoDaddy often offers premium domains for sale and they have a trusted broker service for those must have domains. Forcing a domain sale should not happen. Often domain disputes are handled by force but that is more of a ICANN and court process than a GoDaddy one. 

 

I'm getting the impression that there is another question here @nelsonkane?

 

...turns out that my two cents is worth less or more depending on the current exchange rate.

roy darling *my posts seem a lot shorter in my head

View solution in original post

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Super User I Super User I
Super User I
Solution

Re: When someone becomes a registrar, are they sold software, or do they go to a website to operate?

The answer is "Yes" @nelsonkane.

 

There are different ways to be a registrar and different levels you can go for in addition to several companies you could use. What you get kind of depends on what you choose. You can expect everything from a turnkey website, documentation, tutorials, to API or nothing at all. 

 

As a registrar you sale new or available domains and/or broker existing domains. I don't think that GoDaddy is ever both the seller and broker? GoDaddy often offers premium domains for sale and they have a trusted broker service for those must have domains. Forcing a domain sale should not happen. Often domain disputes are handled by force but that is more of a ICANN and court process than a GoDaddy one. 

 

I'm getting the impression that there is another question here @nelsonkane?

 

...turns out that my two cents is worth less or more depending on the current exchange rate.

roy darling *my posts seem a lot shorter in my head

View solution in original post